HIV Prevention for Black Heterosexual Men: The Barbershop Talk with Brothers Cluster Randomized Trial

AUTHORS

Wilson TE, Gousse Y, Joseph MA, Browne RC, Camilien B, McFarlane D, Mitchell S, Brown H, Urraca N, Romeo D, Johnson S, Salifu M, Stewart M, Vavagiakis P, Fraser M.

Abstract

Objectives

To identify the impact of a strengths-focused HIV prevention program among high-risk heterosexual Black men.

Methods

Barbershops in Brooklyn, New York, neighborhoods with high rates of heterosexually transmitted HIV were randomized to the intervention or an attention control program. Men were recruited from barbershops between 2012 and 2016 and participated in a single small group, peer-led session focused on HIV risk reduction skills and motivation, community health empowerment, and identification of personal strengths and communication skills. The outcome was defined as 1 or more acts of condomless anal or vaginal sex in the preceding 90 days at a 6-month interview.

Results.

Fifty-three barbershops (24 intervention, 29 control) and 860 men (436 intervention, 424 control) were recruited; follow-up was completed by 657 participants (352 intervention, 305 control). Intervention exposure was associated with a greater likelihood of no condomless sex (64.4%) than control group participation (54.1%; adjusted odds ratio = 1.61; 95% confidence interval = 1.05, 2.47).

Conclusions.

Program exposure resulted in reduced sexual risk behaviors, and the program was acceptable for administration in partnership with barbershops.

Public Health Implications.

Dissemination of similar programs could improve public health in communities with high rates of HIV attributable to heterosexual transmission.

Citation

Wilson TE, Gousse Y, Joseph MA, Browne RC, Camilien B, McFarlane D, Mitchell S, Brown H, Urraca N, Romeo D, Johnson S, Salifu M, Stewart M, Vavagiakis P, Fraser M. HIV Prevention for Black Heterosexual Men: The Barbershop Talk with Brothers Cluster Randomized Trial. Am J Public Health. 2019 Jun 20;:e1-e7. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2019.305121. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 31219715

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